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an ode to love

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Healing after the operation continues on schedule, but not as swiftly as I wish it would. Two volunteer supervisors, after I let them know that I won’t be able to serve this week, write gracious notes of appreciation. A friend asks for a quiet moment to confide traumatic memories that continue to haunt. A house filled with sangha members, their partners and children (well, one adorable child so at ease in our midst), home-cooked food in abundance, easy conversation, much laughter, dishes cleaned and put away, left-overs in the fridge.

The very fact that I may sit, able to write and knowing that you’ll be reading this — in short, an abundance of gifts reminding me that love is what truly matters. Not any particular kind of love — neither romantic, platonic, sexual, filial, material, possessive, or otherwise. Reminding myself that I am loved — appreciated, liked, valued, respected, and somehow significant in other people’s lives. Knowing when enough is enough, the saying goes. Appreciate the cup regardless of its fullness; see what’s freely given and always there for the asking.

To mind come lines by Rumi, the 13th century Persian sage who knew all this:

Don’t let your throat tighten
with fear. Take sips of breath
all day and night, before death
closes your mouth.

… and …

Today, like every other day, we wake up empty
and frightened. Don’t open the door to the study
and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument.

Let the beauty we love be what we do.
There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.

source: Excerpts from Barks, C. & Moyne, J. (1995). The Essential Rumi. HarperOne.

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5 responses »

  1. Peter after two days of opening our home transformed into a gallery this weekend, I am so in tune with your post about love… just plain love. Today, I will practice some of those 100 variation of kneeling and kissing the ground as I put paintings and prints away. Best of today to you. Terrill

    Reply
  2. and this:

    This moment
    This LOVE
    comes to rest in me,
    many beings in one being
    In one wheat-grain
    a thousand sheaf stacks.

    Inside the needle’s eye
    a turning night of stars.
    This moment —
    This LOVE

    Reply
  3. Thank you for such wise words. Human connection is what really matters in our lives.

    Reply
  4. I hope you are healing, and I send compassion and strength your way.

    I love Rumi…and I love the Rumi you have quoted. That he speaks from the 13th century straight into our lives and hearts is the great gift!

    My very best.

    Lady Nyo
    (http://ladynyo.wordpress.com)

    Reply

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