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it’s dangerous out there

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I was biking home from hospice today when a car turned right in front of me without signalling. My fists hit the trunk and I was tossed to the pavement. Strangers rushed over to help; also the driver, upset and shaking, apologizing over and over. She scribbled a name and number on a piece of paper and I caught a glimpse of a license plate. And then I remember standing there, bike on the ground, people in a semi-circle … with me comforting the driver and babbling about no-harm-done.

At home now, taking inventory after a hot bath: abrasions on toes, elbows and one knee; bruised belly, groin, and one shoulder; pants torn, undetermined damage to the new bike. Listen here, kids: Don’t ride your bike in traffic unless you’ve first decompressed from one world to another. Ride defensively. If you get knocked off your bike, expect to be in shock. Ask witnesses to write down names and license numbers. You’re not thinking straight. Let yourself be helped.

And a word to drivers: kindly signal your intention to turn (I’m amazed how few do it); check your mirrors (especially in what may be a blind spot) when turning and before opening your door. Thank you.

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3 responses »

  1. and thank goodness you are in one piece. Riding a bike in the city is a tricky proposition – people in cars don’t always see you. thinking of you as the bruises heal…

    Reply
  2. First of all–I’m glad you’re OK. Biking in traffic is risky, at best Second–Yikes! So glad to serendipitously find your site, via a reader to my blog.

    It’s wonderful–and my eye immediately caught your link to Norman Fischer, who I met over 4 silent meditation retreats he led at Elat Chayyim in New York (now in Connecticut) a few years back.. I didn’t know he had a new book out–can’t wait to read it. And an article in O Magazine–wow! I’ve printed it out–and since I’m best described as “a meditator-on-training-wheels” it should be right up my alley.

    So glad to meet you. I’ll be sure to stop by again–anyone who serves with hospice is tops on my list–and has a lot to teach others.

    Reply
  3. thank you for your kind notes and wishes. I’m still sore, but wide awake and riding again. More carefully than ever. Noticed also how my occasional driving has changed: cyclist are on my radar screen, especially those who ride against the traffic, wear no helmets, carry no lights, and cross at red lights. May all be safe!

    Reply

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